Flying Colors

Blue Note, 1997
Flying-Colors

Buy "Flying Colors" Now

  • 1. Flying Colors (Rubalcabo)
    2. How Deep Is the Ocean? (Berlin)
    3. Boss Town (Lovano)
    4. Bird Food (Coleman)
    5. Spontaneous Color
    6. Phantasm (Lovano)
    7. Ugly Beauty (Monk)
    8. Hot House (Dameron)
    9. Gloria’s Step (LaFaro)
    10. Mr. Hyde (Lovano)
    11. I Love Music (Boyd)
    12. Along Came Betty (Golson)

Joe Lovano – Straight Tenor and Soprano Saxophone, Alto Clarinet, Drums, Gong
Gonzalo Rubalcabo – Piano

Produced by Joe Lovano
Recorded February 31, 1997

Gonzalo is one of the most poetic musicians in Jazz today. He plays deepest feeling within his express, and he’s a very lyrical, beautiful player. We’ve had a chance to perform as a duet in concerts throughout the states and Europe and these have been some of the most creative evenings of my life. Within the evening, the nature of our duet changes, because I play saxophones and drums, percussion and gongs, and within each piece we play, the instrumentation is changing. We play over a wide range of personalities.

Similar to Ten Tales, we did this in the studio in one day, a very creative way to record. We got together beforehand and chose some material. I brought in three originals, and we also played some standard pieces, something by Monk, and Ornette, and Gonzalo wrote the title tune.

" The art of the duo, dual reflection, appears to be gradually replacing the navel gazing solo impressionism that was such… read more" " The art of the duo, dual reflection, appears to be gradually replacing the navel gazing solo impressionism that was such a vogue step in the wake of Keith Jarrett’s inward visionings of the ’70s. Many artists are finding the unfettered engagement of a sole collaborator to be a neat way of playing largely unencumbered while still engaging one of the basic elements of jazz-interaction between instruments. Such is the case with this issue from one of the tenor sax titans of our time and the exciting piano stylings of a man equally at home with montuno and Monk. Read the entire review here" Willard Jenkins, Jazz Times